Saturday, September 30, 2017

My Casio Exilim EX-F1 is available for purchase

The Casio EX-F1 remains a high-speed legend ten years after its debut. Here are some of the tech specs that keep it in a class of its own.

High-Speed Video
300 frames per second
600 frames per second
1200 frames per second

Photography
60 frames per second burst rate at full 6 megapixel resolution

The camera was released in 2008 for $999.95. If a sub-$1000 full camera is matching those capabilities in 2018, I'm unaware of it.

Upon its debut, Gizmodo had this to say: Casio Exilim EX-F1 Slow-Mo Super Cam Full Review (Verdict: Totally Unique, Shockingly Powerful)

Enthusiasts have been using this camera for a decade, but the demand was not enough for Casio to continue the line. They soldiered on with lesser bodies (EX-FH20 and FH100) with lesser specs.

Once it was discontinued, the EX-F1 became a highly prized and sought after, selling for up to $3499 on Amazon. Right now.

Used EX-F1s can be had for less (under $1000). But the sellers and descriptions of the state of the product do not inspire confidence. Some confess to be missing manuals and/or cables, but promise they include everything necessary for image capture. Many of the sellers are also at considerable remove (Asia). Purchases involve import/export hassles, fees, and delays.

Here's what I have. A like-new EX-F1 in its original box with all the cables and manuals, battery and charger, lens hood and cap, CD-ROM, and wired remote: it's a close to a new-in-box camera as can be had. Nothing is missing. It's nice to have the manual as there are things to learn so as to make the camera work as expected.

Dean's Casio EX-F1 Flickr: iPhone pics of the product.

My high-speed video web page with many examples of high-speed videos take with the EX-F1. Did you see the tuning fork? The water balloons? The air-rocket launch? The Mentos geysers? Spend some time poking around in those videos!

Here's where you come in!
I'm willing to sell my prized EX-F1 to a bona fide science teacher for $500 + shipping (or best offer once the $500 reserve is met). I want this camera to be put to good use by a classroom instructor. Contact me: dean@phyz.org to let me know you're interested and tell me about your teaching assignment. I'll be keen to see your online listing as a faculty member at your institution. Students may be able to get 120 fps or even 240 fps video on their phones these days, but 1200 fps? Not so much.

If I am unable to locate a science instructor purchaser in October, I'll list it online at a higher price. I would prefer to see it go to a "good home," but I'm also looking to "recycle" the money into other groovy projects.

Here's me on the news about a year after I got the camera. The reporter used a bunch of my clips.

video

[When purchasing camera gear, it is sometimes necessary to justify the expense to a spouse. The storyline here is that you are acquiring a $3500 camera for a fraction of the cost.]

Friday, July 7, 2017

Science Tourism

Today's Science Friday featured 24 minutes on science tourism. Ella Morton and Dylan Thuras, authors of Atlas Obscura: An Explorer’s Guide to the World’s Hidden Wonders joined host Ira Flatow to discuss a plethora of geeky destinations.

Hidden Wonders To Hit On Your Science Road Trip

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Sunscreens failing?

From NPR's Science Friday.

The guest likes products with zinc oxide (which I believe is opaque) or avobenzone (3%). Avobenzone products should have an of SPF between 30 and 50.
 

Saturday, February 25, 2017

Planning for 2018: Norway

I'm "laying low" in 2017 as far as international photo safaris are concerned. I wanted to have financial leeway to do things relative to The Great American Eclipse 2017, and I wasn't sure what shape that would take.

But as it is Presidents' Week 2017, it's time to assemble plans for summer, 2018. So far, I'm booked for

Wildphoto Travel's Svalbard Classic

and am eyeing

68 North's Lofoten Islands Midnight Mountains (this is the 2017 link).

Depending on schedules, I might be able to putter about on some version of

Norway in a Nutshell.

Wildphoto Travels' Svalbard Classic puts you on the ice-hardened but nimble M/S Origo out of Longyearbyen on a "hunt" for landscapes, walruses, and polar bears via a partial circumnavigation of the isolated archipelago located 10 degrees south of the north pole. Here's how that trip went for them in 2013.

Lofoten Midnight Mountains involves hiking in the picturesque Lofoten archipelago, just above the Arctic Circle on Norway's west coat.

Norway in a Nutshell is a popular tourist travel package that allows travelers to get out of Oslo and see the Norwegian countryside and coast via train, bus, and boat.

Obviously, I have time to work out logistics and details. And see if I can learn a bit of Norwegian (Bokmal) via Duolingo prior to departure.

Photo Tour of Oslo
TripAdvisor seems to like this one. I'll pin this here for future reference.

UPDATE 6/3/17: Trips to Africa and Brazil get you thinking about sunscreen and mosquitoes. You still need mosquito protection in Alaska in the summer, but no need for malaria prophylaxis.

Tromping on Norwegian terrain and on a boat, it seems it might be nice to have some grippy boots. Vibram now offers Arctic Grip for traction on wet ice. Traction on wet ice? I'll be keeping an eye on this stuff. Gear Junkie. Digital Trends.

The Art of Polar Bear Photography